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During menopause, your levels of Oestrogen, Progesterone and Testosterone fall.

The Menopause Hub believes, along with NICE and the British Menopause Society guidelines, that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is the most effective treatment available to relieve symptoms caused by the menopause. Hormone replacement therapy works by replacing these ‘lost’ hormones to the correct levels… in amounts appropriate to each individual client.

Falling Oestrogen levels can cause irregular menstrual periods, hot flushes (sudden warm feeling, sometimes with blushing or sweating), night sweats (hot flashes that occur at night, often disrupting sleep), fatigue (from disrupted sleep patterns), mood swings, early morning awakening and vaginal dryness.

Falling Progesterone levels can mean weight gain, a decreased sex drive, mood swings, depression, PMS, irregular menstrual cycle, heavy bleeding, breast tenderness, fibrocystic breasts, fibroids, endometriosis, gallbladder problems and thyroid dysfunction

Falling Testosterone levels can mean dry or thinning skin, or skin has lost its fullness, painful intercourse, fatigue, poor tolerance for exercise, loss of muscle tone in arms and legs, poor memory or concentration and loss of libido.

Everyone loses hormones at different rates – which is why being assessed by a qualified menopause doctor and given a treatment plan designed for you - can help you through your menopause.

COMMON HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY (HRT) CONFUSIONS

  • YOU SHOULD WAIT UNTIL YOU SYMPTOMS ARE REALLY BAD BEFORE YOUR DOCTOR CAN GIVE YOU HRT!

    Not true, there is ample evidence to suggest that the earlier HRT is started the better it protects you from heart disease, osteoporosis and Alzheimer's. For most women HRT benefits outweigh the risks.

  • HRT DELAYS THE MENOPAUSE

    Fake news! Any symptoms that you may have after stopping HRT are actually the menopausal symptoms that you would have suffered even if you had never undergone HRT. And slowly decreasing the levels of hormones over time is the best way to avoid any sudden loss in hormones.

  • YOU HAVE TO STOP HRT AFTER 5 YEARS

    There is actually no maximum amount of time for which you should take HRT. The length of time boils down to individual choice and depends on your individual benefits and risks. Younger women should all take HRT until they are at least 51 years old.

  • HRT CAUSES BREAST CANCER

    HRT with oestrogen alone is associated with little or no change in the risk of breast cancer. Combined HRT can be associated with a small increased risk however this is related to treatment duration and reduces once HRT is stopped. And this risk is less than if you drink two or more alcohol units per day and significantly less than for women who are overweight or obese (BMI over 30)

  • YOU CANNOT TAKE HRT IF YOU SUFFER FROM MIGRAINES

    If you have had migraines in the past then it is recommended that you take HRT in the form of a gel or patch rather than a tablet. If you have suffered from migraines then you should discuss your options with your GP or a member of The Menopause Hub Clinical Team.

  • YOU CANNOT TAKE HRT AND VAGINAL OESTROGEN TOGETHER

    Not true. You may, in fact need to take both types of the hormone, especially if you have local symptoms such as itching or dryness as well as menopausal symptom